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1860's Alex F. Munro ID'd Civil War Tintype Photo Co. B 5th Regt. Army


1860's Alex F. Munro ID'd Civil War Tintype Photo Co. B, 5th Regt. US Artillery Regular Army #483:

This is a beautiful old Civil war era tintype of Alexander Munro, CDV sized in a paper mat. It is a full standing shot in a studio with Alex wearing a pancake style hat, and civilian attire. It is clearly signed "Alex. F. Munro" in front under his image in old dip pen ink.

Found in Public Records:
Alex Munro served in Company B, 5th Regiment, US Artillery (Regular Army) during the Civil War. (see regiment info below) This info was found in National Park Service Civil War Records.

His father, Reverend Alexander Fraser Munro Sr. was born in November 1814 in Banffshire, the child of Alexander Munro and Ann Munro. He had two sons and one daughter with Helen Miller Munro between 1840 and 1845. She was born about 1816 in Kildare, Ireland according to 1851 English records, although other sources say she was born in Scotland.

Alex Jr. was born 1840, in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England UK. His father, also Alexander F., was 26 and his mother, Helen, was 24 when he was born. He had one brother and one sister. Alexander's brother Peter Simcoe Morton Monroe was born in February 1842 when Alexander F was 2 years old.

Alex emigrated with his complete family at age 13 to the USA. He and his brother Peter both fought in the American Civil War.

UK records of Alexander: 1851 St. John's Place Parish Records:
His father Alexander F. Munro was a printer, born in Dundee, Scotland about 1815. His mother Helen Munro, was born in Kildare, Ireland about 1815. He is listed lived in Scholes, Yorkshire at age 11 in 1851, born in Sheffield. He is living with his parents and baby sister Helen Munro and brother Peter M. Munro (2 years younger) in Scholes. Both Helen and Peter were born in York, Yorkshire.

New York, Marriage Newspaper Extracts, 1801-1880 (Barber Collection) Birth, Marriage, & Death: Marriage: February 19, 1870: Alex F. Munro, a printer, married Caroline Best at the residence of Mrs. Davenport, 50 Chapel Street in Brooklyn. Performed by Reverend Richard Povey.

New York, State and Federal Naturalization Records, 1794-1929 Immigration & Travel
Name: Alex F Munro
Civil 3 Oct 1876, Kings, New York, USA
Naturalization: We found Alex Fraser Munro's naturalization document in public records. It was signed by him and executed October 3, 1876.

His famous brother Peter Munro (Peter Simcoe Morton Monroe) married Eugenie Louise Isabelle Testut and they had seven children together. He died in 1922, in New York, New York, at the age of 80. (his wife Eugenie Louise Isabelle Testut was born in February 1844 in New Orleans, Louisiana to Charles Testut and Clementina Testut. She married Peter in 1865. They had seven children in 13 years. She had one brother. (Possibly Peter was stationed in Federally occupied New Orleans, Louisiana whilst fighting for the Union in the Civil War when they met)

From 'The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography 1910': "MUNRO, Peter Simcoe Morton, actor, author and lecturer, was born in York, England, Feb. 17, 1842, son of Rev. Alexander Fraser and Helen (Miller) Munro, both natives of Scotland, who came to America when the subject of this sketch was twelve years old. After attending the Model School, Toronto, Canada, he studied oratory and dramatic art for three years. He began to learn the printing trade, but soon gave it up to enter the dramatic profession, in which he remained for several years, playing many parts in various cities of the United States and Canada in the old stock company days. During the Civil War he enlisted in the 34th Independent Battery of Flying Artillery, NY Volunteers, and served on Roanoke Island and in front of Petersburg. Returning to New York, he yielded to the wish of his father, who was a Presbyterian minister, to give up the stage as a profession and went into the printing business. Although he ranks as an authority on the use of types and on typographical designing, he is even better known in America for his literary and historic abilities, and for his success as a teacher and lecturer. In 1879 he became assistant editor of the “American Model Printer,” the pioneer of the class of technical periodicals, published in New York City by Kelly & Bartholomew. He was successively the business manager of “Thoughts and Events,” a weekly journal of literature and affairs, chief editor of the “Daily Financial Report,” a journal devoted to the money, stock and bond market and chief editor of the “American Art Printer,” probably the most exquisite exponent of advanced typography ever issued, meanwhile serving as the New York correspondent for a number of western and southern journals. In 1892 he assumed the editorship of the “American Pressman,” a monthly, devoted to the interests of the organized printing pressmen of the United States and Canada, who were then battling with the International Typographical Union for recognition as a separate and distinct branch of the printing trade. In this magazine appeared the most trenchant articles from his pen, so forcibly and logically framed that, before two years had elapsed, the Typographical Union was glad to capitulate and fully recognize the autonomy of the printing pressmen. After this victory, Mr. Munro retired and accepted the editorship of the “Exponent,” a society journal published in Brooklyn by John Suter.
For thirty-five years Mr. Munro has been known as a thorough instructor in elocution and dramatic art. Many prominent actors and actresses, clergymen, lecturers, and platform entertainers received their finished training in his Brooklyn studio of expression. For more than thirty years he has taught in the schools, academies and colleges of the Catholic church, among them St. John’s College, Fordham, St. Francis Xavier’s College, New York City, and St. Francis’ College, Brooklyn, College of St. Angela, New Rochelle, N. Y., and the St. John’s Boys Home, Brooklyn, besides a number of parochial schools and literary unions where he is teacher and director of entertainments. He was professor of elocution in the Brooklyn Evening High Schools, for three years. He is the author of a number of comedies, dramas and farces that have been performed with varying success: “A Point of Honor” (1873), “The Banker’s Son,” (1884), “Parvenues,” (1888), “In a Trance,” (1890), “A Needless Sacrifice” (1892), “The Defaulter” (1895), and “An Awful Break,” (1898). The versatility of the man is further shown by his public lectures, the most popular of which are: “The Comedians of the Pen” (illustrated with portraits), “Francis Bret Harte” (illustrated), “Revelations of the Obelisk” (illustrated) and “Impression and Expression.” He has also recently completed a novel of modem life entitled “As Thyself,” which was written in collaboration with his late father-in-law, Dr. Charles Testut."

Alex enlisted in this regiment below, altho we have no info on his actual war record.

BATTERY "B" 5th ARTILLERY.
Organized November, 1862. Duty at Fort Hamilton, N.Y. Harbor, till June, 1863. Attached to 1st Division, Dept. of the Susquehanna, June-July, 1863. Unattached, Dept. West Virginia, to December, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, Dept. West Virginia, to May, 1864. Artillery Brigade, West Virginia, to December, 1864. Reserve Division, West Virginia, to January, 1865. 1st Separate Brigade, 3rd Division, Dept. West Virginia, to April, 1865. Artillery, 2nd Division, West Virginia, to July, 1865. Dept. of Washington, D.C., to

SERVICE:
-Ordered to Dept. of the Susquehanna June, 1863, thence to Harper's Ferry, W. Va., July, 1863. Duty there and in the Dept. of West Virginia, till April, 1864. Sigel's Expedition from Martinsburg, W. Va., to New Market, Va., April 29-May 15, 1864. Battle of New Market May 15. Hunter's Raid to Lynchburg, Va., May 26-July 1. Lynchburg July 17-18. Catawba Mountains June 21. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28. Berryville September 3. Battle of Opequan, Winchester, September 19. Fisher's Hill September 22. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Duty in the Shenandoah Valley and in the Dept. of West Virginia, till July, 1865. At Washington, D.C.

This old tintype photo was recently found in the town of Social Circle, Georgia in Walton County, Newton County approximately 45 miles east of Atlanta. The tintype is housed in a CDV size patriotic card mount with starred border, and is beautifully ink signed by Alex F. Munro, as seen in scans. He is about 20 years old, Civil War era, and has hand tinted cheeks, checkered wool pants, and a braided cravat around his neck. The photographer's cast iron head stand (made to hold sitter's head still during long exposures) can be seen poking out next to his handmade leather boots. A beautiful old piece from a very illustrious Brooklyn family. 

Note: Actual Scans of naturalization, census and wedding records (above) will be included when you order scans. They will be also be included should you order the original.
Size 2.5 x 3.75 inches

Debra Clifford Ancestorville Genealogy   Note: Hello from ~debra. I have spent years collecting over 10,000 ID’d lost family photos & paper from US flea markets & antique shops. I do the best gen research I can, but am always open to corrections. This is an original antique item, not a reprint. A new high quality rigid sleeve is included for extra protection, especially during shipping. You may buy a piece alone, or large intimate 300 dpi scans of the front and back sent immediately via email, or both. Please search carefully, as they are often found together and many may be related. I also invite you to join me at Ancestorville Genealogy on facebook. Thank you, enjoy! ~Debra Clifford (contact info on top bar)

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Original Vintage Photo 1860's Alex F. Munro ID'd Civil War Tintype Photo Co. B 5th Regt. Army - Original Vintage Photo - 483 $85.00
Scans-300 dpi Large Scans of Front/Back-Sent via email 1860's Alex F. Munro ID'd Civil War Tintype Photo Co. B 5th Regt. Army - Scans-300 dpi Large Scans of Front/Back-Sent via email - Scans $3.99


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